Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center

57 Lyme Street  • Old Lyme CT 06371  • (860) 434-1728

  • Parent-Teacher Conferences

    Source: Adapted from H. Seplocha, 2004, "Partnerships for Learning: Conferencing with Families,” Family Ties, Young Children 59 (5): 96–99.

    © National Association for the Education of Young Children — Promoting excellence in early childhood education

     

  • Love, Learning, and Routines

    Routines help babies and toddlers learn self-control.

    Routines can bring you and your child closer together and reduce power struggles.

    Routines guide positive behavior and safety.

    Routines support children’s social skills.

    Routines help children cope with transitions.

    Routines are satisfying for parents, too.

    Routines are an important opportunity for learning.

  • Switching To Solid Foods

     

  • Infants: Taking it All In

    What can you do together?

    Toddlers: Happy Play

  • Click here for tips for starting your baby on solids:

    http://www.parents.com/baby/feeding/solid-foods/menus-by-age/#page=5

  • Avoid Hazards In The Home-Deck The Halls Safely

     

    During the holidays, homes are filled with twinkling lights, holiday guests and festive decorations.  The combination should mean many happy memories, but it also brings an increased risk of home fires.  According to the U.S.Fire Administration, during the winter holidays structure fires increase and the dollar loss per fire is 34% greater than normal.

     

    On top of daily worries such as crib safety and making sure that the child safety locks are in place, moms need to be extra vigilant about fire safety during the holiday season.  Commit a Minute to Safety today and help your family avoid common holiday fire dangers.

     

    Focus On The Fireplace

    Move stockings and holiday decorations off the mantle before starting a fire in your fireplace and always use the fireplace screen.  Recycle wrapping paper instead of burning it in your fireplace.  Burning wrapping paper could produce dangerous sparks or flares of intense heat.

     

    Keep Watch In The Kitchen

    The kitchen is a busy place from Thanksgiving through the holiday season.  Never leave anything cooking unattended, not even for a minute.  Turn pot handles inward so that little hands can’t grab them.  Keep your kitchen and your cooking area free of clutter to avoid unnecessary accidents.

     

    Stay Warm Safely

    Look for the UL Mark on your space heater and read the instructions before using it.  Move space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that can burn (e.g: curtains, blankets) and never leave a space heater on when you leave the room or go to sleep.  Be sure to teach children (and practice it yourself) to never place anything on top of a space heater to dry.

     

    Easy Electrical Safety

    Check electrical outlets and make sure they are not overloaded.  Look for the UL Mark on all your electrical cords and holiday lights.  When decorating, inspect cords for damage and fraying and always keep extension cords away from where children play.  Never run an extension cord under a rug or tack it up to a wall with a nail or staple.

     

    Use Candles With Care

    Walk around your home and move candles away from anything that can burn.  Store matches and lighters away from children and be sure to blow out candles before you leave the room or go to sleep.  Never leave a burning candle unattended.

     

    With just a few simple steps you can help protect your family from hazards in the home this holiday season.

     

  • How to Baby Proof Your Home for the Holidays

    Make It Festive

    Keep It Safe

    Make It Fun

    Make It Tasty

    Holiday Helpers

     

  • Cooperation

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  • Parent-Teacher Conferences

    Source: Adapted from H. Seplocha, 2004, "Partnerships for Learning: Conferencing with Families,” Family Ties, Young Children 59 (5): 96–99.

    © National Association for the Education of Young Children — Promoting excellence in early childhood education

     

  • Routines help babies and toddlers learn self-control.

    Routines can bring you and your child closer together and reduce power struggles.

    Routines guide positive behavior and safety.

    Routines support children’s social skills.

    Routines help children cope with transitions.

    Routines are satisfying for parents, too.

    Routines are an important opportunity for learning.

  • Copyright 2012 ZERO TO THREE:

    National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families

    1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037 | Phone: (202) 638-1144 | Fax: (202) 638-0851

  • Winter Safety Tips for Children

    By Melissa Mayntz

     

    As the weather turns chilly, new dangers for kids are appearing; but these winter safety tips for children can help keep them safe, warm and healthy through the coldest months of the year.

     

    Playing Outside

    The cold temperatures and biting winds are the most obvious hazards when children play in the snow. Children who are not prepared for winter climates can suffer frostbite, hypothermia and severe chills that can lead to illness, poor judgment and even permanent injury. To avoid the dangers of cold weather:

    • Dress in multiple layers to play outside, including extra layers for legs, feet and hands.

    • Always wear hats and gloves when playing outdoors in cold weather; the biggest proportions of body heat are lost through the head and hands.

    • Limit the amount of time spent playing outdoors to safe intervals, and bring children inside periodically to warm up.

    • Remove all wet clothing immediately and change to dry clothes if going back outdoors.

    • Do not permit children to play outdoors in poor weather such as snowstorms, extreme cold or high winds.

    • Wear brightly colored outer clothing that is easily seen from a distance.

    • Do not dress children in winter wear with drawstrings - they can cut off circulation and make frostbite a greater threat, and loose drawstrings may present a strangulation hazard.

    • Teach children to avoid playing near snowplow areas.

    • Do not permit children to dig snow tunnels or forts that may collapse and bury them.

    • Avoid snowball fights that can lead to injuries from dangerous projectiles.

    • Keep roofs, gutters and awnings free from snow and icicle buildup that could collapse and injure a child. Similarly, do not permit children to pull icicles from the roof.

    • Teach children never to touch or lick exposed metal (fences, flagpoles, etc.) in winter.

    • Do not allow children to eat snow. It may contain pollutants, dirt, fecal matter or other contaminants, and the cold snow can chill a young child's body to dangerous levels.

    • Regularly de-ice or sand sidewalks, driveways, patios and other areas where children may play.

     

    Staying Healthy

    The long days of winter often keep children indoors, which can lead to hours of inactivity. Furthermore, children are more likely to contract illnesses during the winter months because they are in more confined spaces. To stay healthy during the winter, consider these safety tips:

    • Eat a healthy, balanced diet that includes fruits and vegetables.

    • Teach children proper hand-washing techniques to kill germs and bacteria or use hand sanitizer if necessary.

    • Keep children home from school and other public places if they are sick.

    • Ask a pediatrician about the necessity for flu vaccines for young children.

     

    Heating Tips

    The natural reaction to falling temperatures is to raise the heat, either through external, supplemental heaters or by turning on a fireplace or other open flames. These safety tips can keep away the winter chill without risk:

    • Keep candles, kerosene lamps, and other open flames out of reach of children at all times.

    • Do not put a space heater in a child's room.

    • Teach children fire safety procedures, including how to spot potential hazards.

    • Do not allow children to play in fires such as roasting marshmallows in a fireplace.

    • Practice family fire drills to reinforce safe behavior.

    • Do not use electric blankets for young children.

     

    http://safety.lovetoknow.com/

     

  • Holiday Safety Tips

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